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Space Policy Directive Signed!

December 11, 2017 —  RELEASE 17-097
New Space Policy Directive Calls for Human Expansion Across Solar System 

Representatives of Congress and the National Space Council joined President Donald J. Trump, Apollo astronaut Jack Schmitt and current NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson Monday, Dec. 11, 2017, for the president’s signing of Space Policy Directive 1, a change in national space policy that provides for a U.S.-led, integrated program with private sector partners for a human return to the Moon, followed by missions to Mars and beyond.

Credits: WhiteHouse.gov

Lunar Sample 70215 was retrieved from the Moon’s surface and returned by NASA’s Apollo 17 crew. The sample is a basaltic lava rock similar to lava found in Hawaii. It crystallized 3.84 billion years ago when lava flowed from the Camelot Crater. Sliced off a parent rock that originally weighed 8,110 grams, the sample weighs 14 grams, and is very fine grained, dense and tough.

Credits: NASA

President Donald Trump is sending astronauts back to the Moon.

The president Monday signed at the White House Space Policy Directive 1, a change in national space policy that provides for a U.S.-led, integrated program with private sector partners for a human return to the Moon, followed by missions to Mars and beyond.

The policy calls for the NASA administrator to “lead an innovative and sustainable program of exploration with commercial and international partners to enable human expansion across the solar system and to bring back to Earth new knowledge and opportunities.” The effort will more effectively organize government, private industry, and international efforts toward returning humans on the Moon, and will lay the foundation that will eventually enable human exploration of Mars.

“The directive I am signing today will refocus America’s space program on human exploration and discovery,” said President Trump. “It marks a first step in returning American astronauts to the Moon for the first time since 1972, for long-term exploration and use. This time, we will not only plant our flag and leave our footprints — we will establish a foundation for an eventual mission to Mars, and perhaps someday, to many worlds beyond.”

The policy grew from a unanimous recommendation by the new National Space Council, chaired by Vice President Mike Pence, after its first meeting Oct. 5. In addition to the direction to plan for human return to the Moon, the policy also ends NASA’s existing effort to send humans to an asteroid. The president revived the National Space Council in July to advise and help implement his space policy with exploration as a national priority.

“Under President Trump’s leadership, America will lead in space once again on all fronts,” said Vice President Pence. “As the President has said, space is the ‘next great American frontier’ – and it is our duty – and our destiny – to settle that frontier with American leadership, courage, and values. The signing of this new directive is yet another promise kept by President Trump.”

Among other dignitaries on hand for the signing, were NASA astronauts Sen. Harrison “Jack” Schmitt, Buzz Aldrin, Peggy Whitson and Christina Koch. Schmitt landed on the moon 45 years to the minute that the policy directive was signed as part of NASA’s Apollo 17 mission, and is the most recent living person to have set foot on our lunar neighbor. Aldrin was the second person to walk on the Moon during the Apollo 11 mission. Whitson spoke to the president from space in April aboard the International Space Station and while flying back home after breaking the record for most time in space by a U.S. astronaut in September. Koch is a member of NASA’s astronaut class of 2013.

Work toward the new directive will be reflected in NASA’s Fiscal Year 2019 budget request next year.

“NASA looks forward to supporting the president’s directive strategically aligning our work to return humans to the Moon, travel to Mars and opening the deeper solar system beyond,” said acting NASA Administrator Robert Lightfoot. “This work represents a national effort on many fronts, with America leading the way. We will engage the best and brightest across government and private industry and our partners across the world to reach new milestones in human achievement. Our workforce is committed to this effort, and even now we are developing a flexible deep space infrastructure to support a steady cadence of increasingly complex missions that strengthens American leadership in the boundless frontier of space. The next generation will dream even bigger and reach higher as we launch challenging new missions, and make new discoveries and technological breakthroughs on this dynamic path.”

A piece of Moon rock was brought to the White House as a reminder of the exploration history and American successes at the Moon on which the new policy will build. Lunar Sample 70215 was retrieved from the Moon’s surface and returned by Schmitt’s Apollo 17 crew. Apollo 17 was the last Apollo mission to land astronauts on the Moon and returned with the greatest amount of rock and soil samples for investigation.

The sample is a basaltic lava rock similar to lava found in Hawaii. It crystallized 3.84 billion years ago when lava flowed from the Camelot Crater. Sliced off a parent rock that originally weighed 8,110 grams, the sample weighs 14 grams, and is very fine grained, dense and tough. During the six Apollo surface excursions from 1969 to 1972, astronauts collected 2,196 rock and soil samples weighting 842 pounds. Scientific studies help us learn about the geologic history of the Moon, as well as Earth. They help us understand the mineral and chemical resources available to support future lunar exploration.

For information about NASA’s missions, programs and activities, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov

-end-

Apollo

This section contains subtopics for each major area.  Please click on each topic and leave comments (names, corrections, suggestions, etc.) in the comment box at the bottom of the page for each.  Thanks.

NOTE:  No copyright protection is asserted for these photographs. If a recognizable person appears in any photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if any photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.

Saturn Launch History and Index

KSC Organazation Charts

KSC Group Pictures

Vintage Spaceport News Personnel Articles

Saturn SA Series

AS-202

LC-39 Firing Room Staffing

Apollo 1

Apollo 4

Apollo 7

Apollo 11

Apollo 12

Apollo 13

Apollo 14

Apollo 15

Apollo 17

Apollo CSM

Apollo LEM

Apollo Contractors

Mercury Atlas

Click on item to expand.

Photos are courtesy of J. L. Pickering.

If you have information to share, please leave comments (names, corrections, suggestions, etc.) in the comment box at the bottom of the page for each topic.  Thanks.

MA-6

Mercury-Atlas 6 (MA-6) was the third human spaceflight for the US and the first to orbit the Earth. John Glenn in Friendship 7 was launched Feb 20, 1962.

MA-6 Atlas Launch Team

The second photo below has the people numbered. The list of names is in work. Click on the photo to expand it until the numbers are legible.

 

MA-6 Launch Team Hi Res

191-MA6-134-62MA6-213_members of launch team at Complex 14 N

If you can provide a name or a correction, please give us a comment in the form below. The people are numbered in three rows left to right. Refer to the row as front or bottom, middle, and back or top as well as the number when identifying an individual.

Names;

 Front, Bottom

1 Maj. Jack Mulady

7 Capt. Jeffery Deutsch

11 Ray McCoy

12 Jim Weber

15 Dave Parrish

16 Les Campbell

18 Jim Rodriguez

21 Ken Newton

22 Sid Brooks

27 Harry Potter

30 John Glenn

31 Spence Henshaw

34 Tom O’Malley

35 Scott Carpenter

36 Harry Packer

45 Benjamin Franklin Price

Middle

1 Art Gaudet

4 Burt Benninghoff

21 Bob Baxter

34 John W. Steinmetz

35 George Downey

40 Gene Gilmore

46 Ott Meotti

48. Bill Heer

53 Bob Goldinger

Back, Top

1 Wilford “Bucket” Milikin

3. John Pope

4 Hank Croskeys

6 Jim Starkey

8 Basil Smith

9 Ed Stuart

12 Howard Marion

16 Jim Starkey

20 Jim Keatley

26 Jay Cooper

31 Ed McGee

39 Ben Price

43 Lee Solid

46 Paul Downey

53 Jerry Pruitt

54. Jerry Groah

MA-6 Mercury Capsule Blockhouse Launch Team

This Blockhouse Launch Team photograph is courtesy of J. L. Pickering.The list of names is in work. If you can provide names or corrections, please provide a comment in the box below.    Click on the photo below to enlarge

156-MA6-105-62MA6-32_Complex 14 blockhouse_1.21

Names:

1.

2. John Williams (?)

3. Paul Donnelly

4. H. H. Luetjen

5. Bill Mosley

6. Walt Kapryan

7. Karl Kovitz

8. (8,9,10,11-NASA Aeromed & Instrumentation)

9.

10.

11.

12. Bob Heine

13. John Otten

14. Jerry Roberts

15. Norm Beckel

16. Jim Means

 

 

MA-7

MA-7 May 24, 1962 copy

 

Names

1. M. Scott Carpenter

2.

3.

4.

MA-9

MA-9 Mercury Capsule Launch Team courtesy of Charlie Mars

The Yellow hats are NASA, and Green hats McDonald Douglas (except the two Astronauts).

Click on the photo to enlarge

MA-9 Mercury Capsule Launch Team

MA-9 Mercury Capsule Launch Team

 

 

1           Don Corcoran

2           Paul Donnelly

3           Gordon Cooper

4           Wally Schirra

5           Ralph Gendilee

6           Bill Mosely

13        Mark Guidry

16        Guy Witherington

22        Bob Heine

26        Bill Criddle

27        Jim Means

28        Bud Powell

35        Chuck Clary

36        Charlie Vaughn

42        Jim Walker

46        Bill Stelges

51        John Janokaitis

65        Larry Bell

70        Herb Crib

“Old Mercury Troops”

Picture taken at George M. Brashear’s retirement, Feb 25, 1999. George was a QC manager for NASA contractors for Mercury through Space Shuttle.

George Brashear, George Page, Tom O'malley

Left to right; George M. Brashear QC Supurvisor for Mercury through Space Shuttle, George Page NASA Manager, Tom O’malley Manager for Rockwell. Taken by C. T. Reece who was a QC Inspector on Mercury.

Vintage KSC Group Pictures

This group contains group pictures not associated with a particular program.

If you have information to share, please leave comments (names, corrections, suggestions, etc.) in the comment box at the bottom of the page for each topic.  Thanks.

Click on the below picture icons twice to enlarge and clarify

                                 Our Leaders

                                                    1950’s or 60’s

P20920

Dr Debus, Dr Gruene, Albert Zeiler, and Karl Sendler

 

                      Dr Debus in Blockhouse 56

below; Electrical Guidance & Control Systems Division, LVO

About 1959

5n copy

Names;

1 Richard Jenke

2 Carl Whiteside

3 Harry Clark

4 Jim Terry

5 Milt Chambers

6

7 Charlie Turner

8 John Twig

9

10 Tom Allen

11 Harry Barnes

12 Jack Fagan

13

14 Curly Chandler

15

16 Bill Wheeler

17        Hensley

18 Bill Wright

19 Bob Ostrander

20

21 Jack Phlieger

22 Richard Deagro

23 Carner Dowling

24 Jim Davidson

25 Jim Jollay

26 John Perkinson

27 Russel Clay

28 Bill Jaffries

29 Ike Rigell

30 Jean Greenfield

31 Dr. Hans Gruene

32 Bob Moser

33 Herb Daft

34 John Avery

35 Mac McCreary

Albert Zeiler Retirement Party

Zeiler retirement party numbered

Names

 1. Karl Sendler

2. Barney Kinnerly

3. Otis Ledbetter

4. John Twig

5. Bob Gorman

6. Dr Kurt Debus

7. Jay Campbell

8. Bill Stealey

9. Albert Zeiler

 

10. Joe Lendle

11. J.B. Russell

13.         Watson

14. Creighton Garrett

15. Dr Hans Gruene

16. Ed Fannin

17. Ike Rigell

18. Tommy Pantoliano

19. Jose Gonzalez

 

 Presentation

Early 1960’s

20

Names, left to right

1 Emil Bertram

2

3  Jim Finn

4 W. O. “Curly” Chandler

5 Dr Kurt Debus

6 Rocco Petrone

7 Jim Russo

8

9

100 Missile Club, Jan 1959

 

3

Names, left to right;

Back

1 William Chandler

2 James Davidson

3 Robert Moser

4 Robert Green

5 Orval Sparkman

6 Frank Childers

7 Lester Owens

8 James Jackson

9 Reuben Wilkinson

Front

1 Albert Zeiler

2 Ike Rigell

3 Grady Williams

4 Theodore Poppel

5 W. L. Gant

6 J. B. Russell

     Walt Kapryan’s Management Team 1972 Apollo 17

     click on the below icon to open pictureAbove

Left to Right

Bob Gray (partially hidden), Bill Shick, Paul Donnelly, Walt Kapryan (seated), George Smith (IBM behind Kappy), Bob Weaver (NAR behind Smith), Roscoe Nicholson (RD),

Bob Moser (behind Nicholson), Ike Rigell, Bill Holmes (Boeing), Hans Gruene, Bob Earhart (IBM), ?, ?, Don Oswald, Wiley Williams (GAEC), George Page, Ted Sasseen, Tom O’Malley (NAR), and John Williams

     NASA QC   Class of 1966

above Names:

If you can provide a name, please make a comment

 

Click on icon to open photo

QC Techniques Grads, 1966

QC Techniques Grads, 1966

Names

2. John Barrow

3. Jesse Cook

4.Yarbrough

5. Bill Stealey

6. Instructor

 

7. Harry Barnes

8. Mel Campbell

9. C. V. Hughes

10. Ira Thompson

Dr. Hans Gruene and group

Early 1960’s

22

Above left to right; John Bell, Dr. Gruene, Bill Wheeler, Curly Chandler

Humorous Award Presentation

Late 1950’s

18n copy

Names;

1 Carrol Rouse

2 Jim Davidson

3 Curly Chandler

4 Bill Wheeler

 

 STS Awards Group

This picture, dated Jan 16, 1988, labeled “STS AWARD PHOTOS. (R1, FRS. 1-3, 5-20) (663) (do) may be those receiving awards given for the Return To Flight Effort. A name list is in work. If you have comments, please use the box below.

Click on the photo to enlarge.

STS Awds N

 

 

5 Jim Jollay

6

7 Jim Finn

8 Al Koller

 

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